Purpose

Our study intends to evaluate prospectively the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as well as to evaluate the potential influence of nutritional-, physical-, and transplant-related factors associated with the development of this complication and its grade of involvement.

Condition

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Over 18 Years
Eligible Genders
All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
No

Inclusion Criteria

  • Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • Age 18 years and older
  • Patients must understand and sign the study informed consent

Exclusion Criteria

  • None

Study Design

Phase
Study Type
Observational
Observational Model
Other
Time Perspective
Prospective

Arm Groups

ArmDescriptionAssigned Intervention
Obsevational
  • Other: Mucositis and nutritional assessments
    Mucositis and nutritional assessments before and during the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Recruiting Locations

More Details

Status
Recruiting
Sponsor
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Study Contact

Juan J Toro, MD, MS
210-617-5300
juan.toro2@va.gov

Detailed Description

Objective: Our study intends to evaluate prospectively the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as well as to evaluate the potential influence of nutritional-, physical-, and transplant-related factors associated with the development of this complication and its grade of involvement.

Research plan: This is a prospective cohort study with an observational basis that involves all of the patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation at the Audie L. Murphy VA Hospital Bone Marrow Transplant Unit and at the University Hospital Bone Marrow Transplant Unit. We expect to enroll 400 patients during a 5-year period.

Methods: In order to answer the study questions, subjects will be assessed several times during the study period. The study involves a multidisciplinary group that will be evaluating and following the subjects. A baseline will be established by a physician and a nutritionist before the subjects start the high-dose chemotherapy regimen. The subjects will be followed with oral evaluations 3 times per week, beginning on the day of the transplant and ending when mucositis resolves, or the patient is discharged home, or 30 days post-transplant, whichever occurs first. At day 15 post-transplant, patients will be evaluated for the second time by the nutritionist. Further information such as blood values, use of medications and treatment complications, will be obtained by daily chart review.

Clinical relevance: Mucositis is, without a doubt, one of the most common and debilitating complications resulting from the intense cytotoxic therapies preceding hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mucositis is not only a problem for the patient who needs to deal with the pain and the rapidly decreasing quality of life, but it is also a problem for the health system. Mucositis frequently results in increased hospital length of stay, resulting in a significant increase in the cost of medical care. Multiple prophylactic and therapeutic attempts have been made in order to control the symptoms and the severity of mucositis. No prevention or cure is available for the disease. Despite the renewed interest in this complication, important gaps in knowledge remain in this area of the supportive care of cancer patients. These gaps in knowledge are wider in the area of mucositis in patients who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from ClinicalTrials.gov (a public registry operated by the National Institutes of Health). The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.